Browse ATS 2021 Abstracts

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ATS 2021 will feature presentations of original research from accepted abstracts. Mini Symposia and Thematic Poster Sessions are abstract based sessions.

Please use the form below to browse scientific abstracts and case reports accepted for ATS 2021. Abstracts presented at the ATS 2021 will be published in the Online Abstract Issue of the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, Volume 203, May 3, 2021.

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Impact of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease and/or Emphysema on Outcomes of Hospitalized Patients with COVID-19 Pneumonia

Session Title
TP92 - TP092 CLINICAL ADVANCES IN SARS-COV-2 AND COVID-19
Abstract
A3814 - Impact of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease and/or Emphysema on Outcomes of Hospitalized Patients with COVID-19 Pneumonia
Author Block: R. M. Marron1, M. Zheng1, G. A. Fernandez Romero2, H. Zhao1, R. Patel3, I. Leopold4, A. Thomas4, T. Standiford4, M. Kumaran4, N. Patlakh1, J. I. Stewart5, G. J. Criner5; 1Thoracic Medicine and Surgery, Lewis Katz School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA, United States, 2Thoracic Medicine and Surgery, Lewis Katz School of Medicine at Temple University, Philadelphia, PA, United States, 3Radiology, Temple University Hospital, Philadelphia, PA, United States, 4Radiology, Lewis Katz School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA, United States, 5Department of Thoracic Medicine and Surgery, Lewis Katz School of Medicine at Temple University, Philadelphia, PA, United States.
Background: Comorbid disease was identified early during the COVID-19 pandemic as a risk factor for severe infection, however, initial rates of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in case series were low and severity of COVID-19 in COPD patients was variable. Methods: We performed a retrospective study of patients admitted with COVID-19 and evaluated outcomes in those with and without COPD and/or emphysema. Patients were identified as having COPD if they had a diagnosis in the medical record and a history of airflow-obstruction on spirometry, or a history of tobacco use and prescribed long-acting bronchodilator(s). Computed tomography scans were evaluated by radiologists. Propensity matching was performed for age, body-mass index (BMI), and serologic data correlated with severity of COVID-19 disease (D-dimer, C-reactive protein, ferritin, fibrinogen, absolute lymphocyte count, lymphocyte percentage, and lactate dehydrogenase).Results: Of 577 patients admitted with COVID-19, 103 had a diagnosis of COPD and/or emphysema. The COPD and/or emphysema cohort was older (67 years vs 58 years, p<0.0001) than the other cohort and had a lower BMI (28.3 kg/m2 vs 31.1 kg/m2, p<0.01). Among unmatched cohorts those with COPD and/or emphysema had higher rates of intensive care unit (ICU) admission (35% vs 24.9%, p=0.036) and maximal respiratory support requirements (p=0.007), with more frequent invasive mechanical ventilation (21.4% vs 11.8%), and a trend towards higher mortality (12.6% vs 8.2%) that was not statistically significant (p=0.158). After propensity-matching there was no difference in rates of ICU admission, maximal respiratory support requirements, or mortality. The propensity-matched group with COPD and/or emphysema had higher median pack-years of tobacco use (35.0 vs 17.5, p=0.046) and rates of active smoking (28.2% vs 9.7%, p<0.01). Propensity matching was not performed for rates of comorbid disease such as coronary artery disease but the propensity-matched groups had no significant differences in cardiac comorbidities.DiscussionOur propensity-matched retrospective cohort study suggests that patients hospitalized with COVID-19 that have COPD and/or emphysema may not have worse outcomes than those without these comorbid conditions.