Browse ATS 2021 Abstracts

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ATS 2021 will feature presentations of original research from accepted abstracts. Mini Symposia and Thematic Poster Sessions are abstract based sessions.

Please use the form below to browse scientific abstracts and case reports accepted for ATS 2021. Abstracts presented at the ATS 2021 will be published in the Online Abstract Issue of the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, Volume 203, May 3, 2021.

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Is Trust in Medical and Public Authorities and the Media Associated with COVID-19 Related Stress, Perceptions, Safety Behaviors, Inflammatory Biomarkers and Sleep Quality Among Black Adults?

Session Title
TP11 - TP011 USE OF HEALTH SERVICES AND MEDICAL EDUCATION RESEARCH TO EVALUATE THE EFFECT OF COVID-19
Abstract
A1495 - Is Trust in Medical and Public Authorities and the Media Associated with COVID-19 Related Stress, Perceptions, Safety Behaviors, Inflammatory Biomarkers and Sleep Quality Among Black Adults?
Author Block: R. I. Blair1, N. Kaur2, I. Oriaku2, S. Levsky1, K. Gans3, F. Patterson4, J. P. Crowley5, A. Satti2; 1Lewis Katz School of Medicine at Temple University, Philadelphia, PA, United States, 2Thoracic Medicine and Surgery, Lewis Katz School of Medicine, Temple University Hospital, Philadelphia, PA, United States, 3College of Public Health, Temple University, Philadelphia, PA, United States, 4College of Health Sciences, University of Delaware, Newark, DE, United States, 5Department of Communication, University of Delaware, Newark, DE, United States.
Background: Mistrust of medical and public authorities and the media in the Black community may exacerbate their COVID-19 related stress, perceptions, safety behaviors, inflammatory biomarkers and poor sleep quality. We examined this hypothesis in a sample of underserved Black adults. Methods: Black adults (n=67) recruited from a clinical setting completed assessments of medical mistrust, trust in public authorities and the media as well as a scale to assess COVID-19 related stress, perceptions, and safety behaviors. Inflammation levels were measured using C-Reactive Protein levels derived from a blood assay. Sleep Quality was indicated using apnea hypopnea index (AHI) and REM generated by a home sleep assessment tool (Itamar WatchPAT200). The association between feelings of mistrust with COVID-19 related outcomes were examined using bivariate correlations. Results: The study sample were 66% female and had a mean age of 56.1 (SD=5.1) years. Overall, participants endorsed high levels of mistrust in medical and public authorities, high levels of COVID-related stress, and low engagement in safety behaviors (see Table 1). Higher levels of medical mistrust were associated with a lower belief that reducing the number of people met in a day (r= -.258; p<.05) and avoiding public transportation (r= -.259; p<.05), would reduce the risk of contracting COVID-19. Lower levels of trust in public authorities were associated with higher levels of AHI (r= -.312; p<.05), and less REM sleep (r= .444; p<.01). Lower levels of media trust were associated with higher levels of inflammation (CRP; r= -.368; p<.05) and AHI (r= -.413; p<.05). Discussion: Mistrust of medical, public authority, and media entities in the context of COVID-19 was high in this small clinical sample. Higher levels of medical mistrust was particularly relevant to lower endorsement of important COVID-19 protective behaviors. Lower levels of trust in public authorities and media were more relevant to poorer sleep quality and greater inflammation. Rebuilding trust of these entities among under-resourced populations may be critical to forestalling the COVID-19 pandemic.
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